Mediaverse: On Enough! (The Powell Effect)

Mediaverse

On Enough! (The Powell Effect)

I could care less about the “Bradley Effect.”

If a voter, who happens to be white, says that he/she plans to vote for Sen. Barack Obama for president but has a change of heart in the ballot booth, then, well, that’s between that person, his/her conscience and God. I’m just not will not willing to automatically assume that person is a racist. Call me naïve, if you will.
I’m more concerned about what I can now best describe as the “Powell Effect.”

The effect has little to do with who Powell, the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and former Secretary of State, endorsed Sunday but it has everything to do with how Powell, a Republican, did what he did and the gutteral response to it in some quarters.

I’m just sayin, there are few who would disagree that Powell is one of the nation’s most respected Americans. He earned it.

Little Green Footballs: McCain Supporters Policing Their Own Camp

Little Green Footballs

McCain Supporters Policing Their Own Camp

A group of McCain supporters confronts another group of McCain supporters peddling the “Obama’s a Muslim” smear. Good for them.

Video

NewsMax: Powell Is Wrong About Obama’s Muslim Past

NewsMax

Powell Is Wrong About Obama’s Muslim Past

Appearing on “Meet the Press” Sunday, Colin Powell claimed one reason he is endorsing Barack Obama is that fellow Republicans are spreading falsehoods about him.

Specifically, Powell claimed Republicans are spreading the claim that Obama is a “Muslim.”

“I’m also troubled by, not what Senator McCain says, but what members of the party say, and it is permitted to be said; such things as, ‘Well, you know that Mr. Obama is a Muslim,'” Powell said.

He quickly continued: “Well, the correct answer is, He is not a Muslim. He’s a Christian. He’s always been a Christian.”

But Powell’s statement is wrong. By Obama’s own admission he was not always a Christian. By his account, he became a Christian in his late 20s after meeting the Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr. in Chicago.

Obama was also raised, at least partially, as a Muslim during his childhood.

The facts are indisputable on this score.

Barack Hussein Obama was born to a Muslim father, with the same name, from Kenya.

After his father divorced his mother, a secular humanist, she remarried, this time to a Muslim man from Indonesia. The couple moved from Hawaii to Indonesia.

While there Obama attended two separate schools and was registered at both as a Muslim student.

As such, he studied the Quran and prayed with Muslim students. According to family members, he attended mosque with his father, albeit infrequently.

Of course, Powell is right, any American of any faith should be able to become president or hold any position the U.S. government has to offer.

But the issue raised by many thoughtful Republicans and others is not whether Obama is a Muslim — but why Obama feels it necessary to hide his past ties to the Muslim faith and, as Pipes claim, to “lie” about his past association with it.

Considering the media went to great lengths to make Mitt Romney’s Mormon faith an issue in the GOP primaries, and Sarah Palin’s faith has been heavily scrutinized, thinking Americans want to know why Obama’s past and faith are off limits.

Jerusalem: NYU poll: US Jews favor Obama 2:1

Jerusalem

NYU poll: US Jews favor Obama 2:1

The data, taken from a nationwide poll conducted in early September, indicates that Jews as a group are 30 percent more likely than other white, non-Hispanic voters to support Obama.

Surprisingly, the poll found that gap widened to nearly 40% among Jews who rank Israel “very high” as a factor in their choice of candidate, indicating that Israel is a key issue for Jews across the political spectrum.

“Jews always look at candidates in their own camp as more sympathetic to their positions as Jews, so liberal Jews will tend to feel Obama is more pro-Israel than conservative Jews do,” lead researcher Steven Cohen, a professor of Jewish social policy at Hebrew Union College, told The Jerusalem Post.

“In fact, liberal Jews have an argument about why McCain is bad for Israel, just as conservative Jews have an argument for why Obama is bad for Israel,” he said. “There’s a tendency toward cognitive consistency.”

Nonetheless, support for McCain tracked support for Israel, with 58% of Jews who said Israel was very important favoring McCain.

Orthodox Jews – a category that encompasses Modern Orthodox and haredi respondents, Cohen said – were the likeliest to support McCain, with 73% indicating support for the Republican over just 27% for Obama.

Support for McCain was highest – 90% – among Orthodox Jews who said they socialized exclusively with other Jews, while only 60% of Orthodox respondents who said they had non-Jewish friends planned to vote for McCain.

Washington Monthly: WRIGHT REDUX?

Washington Monthly

WRIGHT REDUX?

Way back in March, John McCain appeared on Fox News, and Sean Hannity practically begged McCain to attack Barack Obama over Jeremiah Wright. It didn’t work. After Hannity noted questions about the former pastor of Obama’s former church, the Fox News personality asked “Would you go to a church like that?” McCain responded, “Obviously, that would not be my choice. But I do know Sen. Obama. He does not share those views.”

That, in a way, should have effectively ended the story, but that obviously didn’t happen. The “issue” lingers, and the Republican Smear Machine is chomping at the bit to start making Wright the single most important issue in the campaign. McCain, according to most media accounts, has said it’s the one attack he won’t make.

That is, that was what McCain said last week. Now, all of a sudden, Wright might be on the table again.

John McCain’s campaign manager says he is reconsidering using Barack Obama’s relationship with Reverend Jeremiah Wright as a campaign issue during the election’s closing weeks.

In an appearance on conservative Hugh Hewitt’s radio program, Davis said that circumstances had changed since John McCain initially and unilaterally took Obama’s former pastor off the table. The Arizona Republican, Davis argued, had been jilted by the remarks of Rep. John Lewis, who compared recent GOP crowds to segregationist George Wallace’s rallies. And, as such, the campaign was going to “rethink” what was in and out of political bounds.

“Look, John McCain has told us a long time ago before this campaign ever got started, back in May, I think, that from his perspective, he was not going to have his campaign actively involved in using Jeremiah Wright as a wedge in this campaign,” he said late last week. “Now since then, I must say, when Congressman Lewis calls John McCain and Sarah Palin and his entire group of supporters, 50 million people strong around this country, that we’re all racists and we should be compared to George Wallace and the kind of horrible segregation and evil and horrible politics that was played at that time, you know, that you’ve got to rethink all these things. And so I think we’re in the process of looking at how we’re going to close this campaign. We’ve got 19 days, and we’re taking serious all these issues.”

 

 

Rick Davis has said a lot of blisteringly stupid things over the course of the campaign, but this might top them all. Davis wants to put Wright on the table because McCain’s losing, but he doesn’t have the courage to say so. He has to rationalize his craven decisions by blaming John Lewis, which is just pathetic, even by Rick Davis’ standards.

Nashville Post Politics: Obama Gains Two Votes On Race For Every One He Loses

Nashville Post Politics

Obama Gains Two Votes On Race For Every One He Loses

George Will on Americans’ yearning to elect a black president:

Booker Rising: VIDEO: Ward Connerly On Race

Booker Rising

VIDEO: Ward Connerly On Race

The founder of the American Civil Rights Institute and libertarian Republican discusses his battle to end affirmative action in Colorado and Nebraska